Blog

#Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram.

#Crabtree
17 December

A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).

Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 

All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram.

Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications.

Smart, Relevant, Provocative
11 December

Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.

The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.

NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.

The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 

The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.

NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications.

NB Wednesday4 December—
After all the excitement of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, we thought we’d join in. Until Friday 13th December, there’s 10% off most items in our shop and free UK delivery. Happy shopping!

NB Wednesday
4 December

After all the excitement of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, we thought we’d join in. Until Friday 13th December, there’s 10% off most items in our shop and free UK delivery. Happy shopping!

The streets of Milan, in Miami 28 November  —
In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 
This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!
It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop. The streets of Milan, in Miami 28 November  —
In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 
This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!
It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop.

The streets of Milan, in Miami
28 November

In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 

This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!

It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop.

Can we quote you on that?20 November—
As a studio, we’re always grabbing images and quotes by other people that inspire us. So it was a pleasant change to have someone point out to us recently that we (well, Nick) had been quoted by a journalist, and on the Guardian’s website no less. It was a quote he’d given ages ago about our British Heart Foundation annual reports, and their game-changing innovative formats. The whole article can be found here.

It’s interesting to see the work you’ve done (often in a bit of a vacuum at the time, due to pressing deadlines and budget constraints) put into a wider perspective of trends across a sector. It’s also rewarding to see our work cited as an example of design which delivers a higher impact. As anyone who’s worked with clients in the charity sector knows, it’s paramount to get as much ‘bang for your buck’. The BHF annual reports, with their unusual formats, meant that audiences picked them up and engaged with them out of curiosity as much as anything. We think they are some of the most ground-breaking projects we’ve worked on in the charity sector, and we’re still very proud of them. 

Now, off to update our press cutting folder…. Can we quote you on that?20 November—
As a studio, we’re always grabbing images and quotes by other people that inspire us. So it was a pleasant change to have someone point out to us recently that we (well, Nick) had been quoted by a journalist, and on the Guardian’s website no less. It was a quote he’d given ages ago about our British Heart Foundation annual reports, and their game-changing innovative formats. The whole article can be found here.

It’s interesting to see the work you’ve done (often in a bit of a vacuum at the time, due to pressing deadlines and budget constraints) put into a wider perspective of trends across a sector. It’s also rewarding to see our work cited as an example of design which delivers a higher impact. As anyone who’s worked with clients in the charity sector knows, it’s paramount to get as much ‘bang for your buck’. The BHF annual reports, with their unusual formats, meant that audiences picked them up and engaged with them out of curiosity as much as anything. We think they are some of the most ground-breaking projects we’ve worked on in the charity sector, and we’re still very proud of them. 

Now, off to update our press cutting folder….

Can we quote you on that?
20 November

As a studio, we’re always grabbing images and quotes by other people that inspire us. So it was a pleasant change to have someone point out to us recently that we (well, Nick) had been quoted by a journalist, and on the Guardian’s website no less. It was a quote he’d given ages ago about our British Heart Foundation annual reports, and their game-changing innovative formats. The whole article can be found here.

It’s interesting to see the work you’ve done (often in a bit of a vacuum at the time, due to pressing deadlines and budget constraints) put into a wider perspective of trends across a sector. It’s also rewarding to see our work cited as an example of design which delivers a higher impact. As anyone who’s worked with clients in the charity sector knows, it’s paramount to get as much ‘bang for your buck’. The BHF annual reports, with their unusual formats, meant that audiences picked them up and engaged with them out of curiosity as much as anything. We think they are some of the most ground-breaking projects we’ve worked on in the charity sector, and we’re still very proud of them. 

Now, off to update our press cutting folder….

Open mind
12 November —
I hated maths at school.
My parents spent a fortune on extra lessons. I told them not to bother, they didn’t listen. And predictably it was the only O level I failed – I didn’t care, I was off to Art School.
A few years after graduating I was talking randomly to someone at a party; she informed me that she had an MA in Applied Mathematics. I told her what I thought about Pythagorus, geometry and logarithms and said the only thing that was essential with numbers was learning how to add 20% on to a handling fee.
I was totally and utterly wrong.
I was just wrapped up in Graphic Design, and less than half an hour later my short-sighted and stubborn opinion had changed for ever.
She talked about the beauty and magic of equations and formulas, the fascination and sometimes lifelong dedication of mathematicians to solving particular problems.
She talked about the universe, the science of nature and the perfect mix of both the arts and mathematics – The Golden Ratio which has fascinated Intellectuals, mathematicians, artists and architects for at least 2,400 years. I learned about Alan Turin and his amazing code breaking work at Bletchley Park. (It took 2 years off the second World War and probably saved 2 million lives). So much for my instant dismissal of logarithms! 
Since then I’ve always tried to keep an open mind about everything, and tried to see the beauty in the smallest task (I’m always caught staring at the amazing moving colours in washing up bubbles).
Starting with an open mind is now the one of NB’s core philosophies. It’s important to us as we work in a wide variety of sectors, on a variety of projects, from packaging to campaigns, brand identities to websites. Michael Wolff narrates in our ‘Why Us?’ video:
“We start with an open mind. Some people say an open mind is an empty mind, and in a way it is. We have to have an empty mind so that we can become your customer, so that we can become the people you want to connect with.”
Alan Dye
Further reading:
Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character
BBC History: Alan Turing Open mind
12 November —
I hated maths at school.
My parents spent a fortune on extra lessons. I told them not to bother, they didn’t listen. And predictably it was the only O level I failed – I didn’t care, I was off to Art School.
A few years after graduating I was talking randomly to someone at a party; she informed me that she had an MA in Applied Mathematics. I told her what I thought about Pythagorus, geometry and logarithms and said the only thing that was essential with numbers was learning how to add 20% on to a handling fee.
I was totally and utterly wrong.
I was just wrapped up in Graphic Design, and less than half an hour later my short-sighted and stubborn opinion had changed for ever.
She talked about the beauty and magic of equations and formulas, the fascination and sometimes lifelong dedication of mathematicians to solving particular problems.
She talked about the universe, the science of nature and the perfect mix of both the arts and mathematics – The Golden Ratio which has fascinated Intellectuals, mathematicians, artists and architects for at least 2,400 years. I learned about Alan Turin and his amazing code breaking work at Bletchley Park. (It took 2 years off the second World War and probably saved 2 million lives). So much for my instant dismissal of logarithms! 
Since then I’ve always tried to keep an open mind about everything, and tried to see the beauty in the smallest task (I’m always caught staring at the amazing moving colours in washing up bubbles).
Starting with an open mind is now the one of NB’s core philosophies. It’s important to us as we work in a wide variety of sectors, on a variety of projects, from packaging to campaigns, brand identities to websites. Michael Wolff narrates in our ‘Why Us?’ video:
“We start with an open mind. Some people say an open mind is an empty mind, and in a way it is. We have to have an empty mind so that we can become your customer, so that we can become the people you want to connect with.”
Alan Dye
Further reading:
Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character
BBC History: Alan Turing Open mind
12 November —
I hated maths at school.
My parents spent a fortune on extra lessons. I told them not to bother, they didn’t listen. And predictably it was the only O level I failed – I didn’t care, I was off to Art School.
A few years after graduating I was talking randomly to someone at a party; she informed me that she had an MA in Applied Mathematics. I told her what I thought about Pythagorus, geometry and logarithms and said the only thing that was essential with numbers was learning how to add 20% on to a handling fee.
I was totally and utterly wrong.
I was just wrapped up in Graphic Design, and less than half an hour later my short-sighted and stubborn opinion had changed for ever.
She talked about the beauty and magic of equations and formulas, the fascination and sometimes lifelong dedication of mathematicians to solving particular problems.
She talked about the universe, the science of nature and the perfect mix of both the arts and mathematics – The Golden Ratio which has fascinated Intellectuals, mathematicians, artists and architects for at least 2,400 years. I learned about Alan Turin and his amazing code breaking work at Bletchley Park. (It took 2 years off the second World War and probably saved 2 million lives). So much for my instant dismissal of logarithms! 
Since then I’ve always tried to keep an open mind about everything, and tried to see the beauty in the smallest task (I’m always caught staring at the amazing moving colours in washing up bubbles).
Starting with an open mind is now the one of NB’s core philosophies. It’s important to us as we work in a wide variety of sectors, on a variety of projects, from packaging to campaigns, brand identities to websites. Michael Wolff narrates in our ‘Why Us?’ video:
“We start with an open mind. Some people say an open mind is an empty mind, and in a way it is. We have to have an empty mind so that we can become your customer, so that we can become the people you want to connect with.”
Alan Dye
Further reading:
Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character
BBC History: Alan Turing

Open mind

12 November

I hated maths at school.

My parents spent a fortune on extra lessons. I told them not to bother, they didn’t listen. And predictably it was the only O level I failed – I didn’t careI was off to Art School.

A few years after graduating I was talking randomly to someone at a party; she informed me that she had an MA in Applied Mathematics. I told her what I thought about Pythagorus, geometry and logarithms and said the only thing that was essential with numbers was learning how to add 20% on to a handling fee.

I was totally and utterly wrong.

I was just wrapped up in Graphic Design, and less than half an hour later my short-sighted and stubborn opinion had changed for ever.

She talked about the beauty and magic of equations and formulas, the fascination and sometimes lifelong dedication of mathematicians to solving particular problems.

She talked about the universe, the science of nature and the perfect mix of both the arts and mathematics  The Golden Ratio which has fascinated Intellectuals, mathematicians, artists and architects for at least 2,400 years. I learned about Alan Turin and his amazing code breaking work at Bletchley Park. (It took 2 years off the second World War and probably saved 2 million lives). So much for my instant dismissal of logarithms! 

Since then I’ve always tried to keep an open mind about everything, and tried to see the beauty in the smallest task (I’m always caught staring at the amazing moving colours in washing up bubbles).

Starting with an open mind is now the one of NB’s core philosophies. It’s important to us as we work in a wide variety of sectors, on a variety of projects, from packaging to campaigns, brand identities to websites. Michael Wolff narrates in our ‘Why Us?’ video:

“We start with an open mind. Some people say an open mind is an empty mind, and in a way it is. We have to have an empty mind so that we can become your customer, so that we can become the people you want to connect with.”

Alan Dye

Further reading:

Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman: Adventures of a Curious Character

BBC History: Alan Turing

Inside Out: San Francisco24 October—
Invited to participate in the AIGA San Francisco poster exhibition by fellow designer Rob Duncan I couldn’t say no.
Luckily, I’ve been to SF, I went with a few friends including NB partner Alan Dye. It was the starting point for the drive along route 66 and beyond. What we got up to there I’d rather not commit to print and as such not much use as inspiration for this poster.
So, to the job in hand. I put pen to sketch-book, toyed with a few ideas, and struggled to come up with a solution I was happy with. I was sure I wanted to avoid the cliches - the fog, the golden gate bridge, cable cars. Frustrated I presented the NB team with a list of half designed possibilities to garner opinion:
Did you know that San Francisco was originally called Yerba Buena or ‘Good Herb’? Or that the man from Del Monte rarely said ‘No’? Or there was a film released in 2006 called ‘The Bridge’ which showed people committing suicide over the course of a year? That there were originally 8 colours in the rainbow flag but that was reduced to 6 to keep production costs down? That most people at NB don’t know who Karl Malden is - think 70’s TV cop drama ‘The Streets of San Francisco’ alongside Michael Douglas? And that Silicon Valley isn’t strictly speaking San Francisco? That a map of San Francisco is less inspiring than the reality of it’s undulating hills and sidewalks? Do you feel lucky punk? Well do you? etc.
Back to the drawing board.
Eventually, I settled on one thing, one very small thing. It has the letters L.S. & Co. S.F printed in a circle around a stud - a kind of roundel. The LEVI’S rivet -San Francisco was the birthplace of an icon. And my first ‘real’ pair of jeans.
An idea had struck and I set one of our designers, Derek, a task; let’s use it as a full stop. Let’s find some meaningful words we can feature; a passage from ‘On the Road’ or a continuous list of superlatives to describe the city. I showed Derek the Lipsmackinpepsi ads from the seventies as inspiration (by Dave Trott I recently discovered) - this backfired slightly - it has no full stop. Or spaces. 
Later Derek returned with a better idea in the form of a democratic list of blue jean wearers. Now we have a poster celebrating the global icon that transcends fashion and social borders. Derek painstakingly applied the 135 copper coloured rivets across 3 posters in the form of fiddly dry transfer decals. (Thank you Derek).
Nick Finney Inside Out: San Francisco24 October—
Invited to participate in the AIGA San Francisco poster exhibition by fellow designer Rob Duncan I couldn’t say no.
Luckily, I’ve been to SF, I went with a few friends including NB partner Alan Dye. It was the starting point for the drive along route 66 and beyond. What we got up to there I’d rather not commit to print and as such not much use as inspiration for this poster.
So, to the job in hand. I put pen to sketch-book, toyed with a few ideas, and struggled to come up with a solution I was happy with. I was sure I wanted to avoid the cliches - the fog, the golden gate bridge, cable cars. Frustrated I presented the NB team with a list of half designed possibilities to garner opinion:
Did you know that San Francisco was originally called Yerba Buena or ‘Good Herb’? Or that the man from Del Monte rarely said ‘No’? Or there was a film released in 2006 called ‘The Bridge’ which showed people committing suicide over the course of a year? That there were originally 8 colours in the rainbow flag but that was reduced to 6 to keep production costs down? That most people at NB don’t know who Karl Malden is - think 70’s TV cop drama ‘The Streets of San Francisco’ alongside Michael Douglas? And that Silicon Valley isn’t strictly speaking San Francisco? That a map of San Francisco is less inspiring than the reality of it’s undulating hills and sidewalks? Do you feel lucky punk? Well do you? etc.
Back to the drawing board.
Eventually, I settled on one thing, one very small thing. It has the letters L.S. & Co. S.F printed in a circle around a stud - a kind of roundel. The LEVI’S rivet -San Francisco was the birthplace of an icon. And my first ‘real’ pair of jeans.
An idea had struck and I set one of our designers, Derek, a task; let’s use it as a full stop. Let’s find some meaningful words we can feature; a passage from ‘On the Road’ or a continuous list of superlatives to describe the city. I showed Derek the Lipsmackinpepsi ads from the seventies as inspiration (by Dave Trott I recently discovered) - this backfired slightly - it has no full stop. Or spaces. 
Later Derek returned with a better idea in the form of a democratic list of blue jean wearers. Now we have a poster celebrating the global icon that transcends fashion and social borders. Derek painstakingly applied the 135 copper coloured rivets across 3 posters in the form of fiddly dry transfer decals. (Thank you Derek).
Nick Finney

Inside Out: San Francisco
24 October

Invited to participate in the AIGA San Francisco poster exhibition by fellow designer Rob Duncan I couldn’t say no.

Luckily, I’ve been to SF, I went with a few friends including NB partner Alan Dye. It was the starting point for the drive along route 66 and beyond. What we got up to there I’d rather not commit to print and as such not much use as inspiration for this poster.

So, to the job in hand. I put pen to sketch-book, toyed with a few ideas, and struggled to come up with a solution I was happy with. I was sure I wanted to avoid the cliches - the fog, the golden gate bridge, cable cars. Frustrated I presented the NB team with a list of half designed possibilities to garner opinion:

Did you know that San Francisco was originally called Yerba Buena or ‘Good Herb’? Or that the man from Del Monte rarely said ‘No’? Or there was a film released in 2006 called ‘The Bridge’ which showed people committing suicide over the course of a year? That there were originally 8 colours in the rainbow flag but that was reduced to 6 to keep production costs down? That most people at NB don’t know who Karl Malden is - think 70’s TV cop drama ‘The Streets of San Francisco’ alongside Michael Douglas? And that Silicon Valley isn’t strictly speaking San Francisco? That a map of San Francisco is less inspiring than the reality of it’s undulating hills and sidewalks? Do you feel lucky punk? Well do you? etc.

Back to the drawing board.

Eventually, I settled on one thing, one very small thing. It has the letters L.S. & Co. S.F printed in a circle around a stud - a kind of roundel. The LEVI’S rivet -San Francisco was the birthplace of an icon. And my first ‘real’ pair of jeans.

An idea had struck and I set one of our designers, Derek, a task; let’s use it as a full stop. Let’s find some meaningful words we can feature; a passage from ‘On the Road’ or a continuous list of superlatives to describe the city. I showed Derek the Lipsmackinpepsi ads from the seventies as inspiration (by Dave Trott I recently discovered) - this backfired slightly - it has no full stop. Or spaces. 

Later Derek returned with a better idea in the form of a democratic list of blue jean wearers. Now we have a poster celebrating the global icon that transcends fashion and social borders. Derek painstakingly applied the 135 copper coloured rivets across 3 posters in the form of fiddly dry transfer decals. (Thank you Derek).

Nick Finney

From the NB archive: Nincomsoup (and other thoughts)16 October—
Yesterday I was in Old St tube station and I saw Nincomsoup, the independent soup kitchen/café we branded back in 1999. I’m pleased to report that it still looks as fresh today as it did then. It was a very early job for NB and involved lots of collaboration, an exercise in naming, positioning and a visual identity that was worthy of a Design week award. 
Later that day, on my way home, I walked past the new Harris and Hoole coffee shop in Ealing. Back in January, Harris and Hoole were criticised for presenting its shops as independent and local when it was being backed by Tesco, one of the world’s biggest retailers (did you know that £1 in every £8 spent in the UK is at Tesco?).  
It’s got me thinking about how Tesco (who have a history of amazing and innovative business strategy – the first to sell Petrol at supermarkets in 1973, the first supermarket to introduce a ‘value’ range, the clubcard, online shopping etc…) are trying to tap into and trade on the independent/local, ‘look and feel’. In fact, it’s pretty well known that a small number of large, global brands are the owners of a proliferation of much smaller, consumer brands. Often this association and ownership is ‘hidden’ by what is known as brand architecture. Sometimes these associations manifest themselves as a tiny logo on the back of a product (see Innocent & Copella Apple Juice), and sometimes it’s only a line in an Annual Report (Harris and Hoole).
Branding: Is it deception? Is it lies? One thing is for sure, it’s effective…
Alan Dye From the NB archive: Nincomsoup (and other thoughts)16 October—
Yesterday I was in Old St tube station and I saw Nincomsoup, the independent soup kitchen/café we branded back in 1999. I’m pleased to report that it still looks as fresh today as it did then. It was a very early job for NB and involved lots of collaboration, an exercise in naming, positioning and a visual identity that was worthy of a Design week award. 
Later that day, on my way home, I walked past the new Harris and Hoole coffee shop in Ealing. Back in January, Harris and Hoole were criticised for presenting its shops as independent and local when it was being backed by Tesco, one of the world’s biggest retailers (did you know that £1 in every £8 spent in the UK is at Tesco?).  
It’s got me thinking about how Tesco (who have a history of amazing and innovative business strategy – the first to sell Petrol at supermarkets in 1973, the first supermarket to introduce a ‘value’ range, the clubcard, online shopping etc…) are trying to tap into and trade on the independent/local, ‘look and feel’. In fact, it’s pretty well known that a small number of large, global brands are the owners of a proliferation of much smaller, consumer brands. Often this association and ownership is ‘hidden’ by what is known as brand architecture. Sometimes these associations manifest themselves as a tiny logo on the back of a product (see Innocent & Copella Apple Juice), and sometimes it’s only a line in an Annual Report (Harris and Hoole).
Branding: Is it deception? Is it lies? One thing is for sure, it’s effective…
Alan Dye From the NB archive: Nincomsoup (and other thoughts)16 October—
Yesterday I was in Old St tube station and I saw Nincomsoup, the independent soup kitchen/café we branded back in 1999. I’m pleased to report that it still looks as fresh today as it did then. It was a very early job for NB and involved lots of collaboration, an exercise in naming, positioning and a visual identity that was worthy of a Design week award. 
Later that day, on my way home, I walked past the new Harris and Hoole coffee shop in Ealing. Back in January, Harris and Hoole were criticised for presenting its shops as independent and local when it was being backed by Tesco, one of the world’s biggest retailers (did you know that £1 in every £8 spent in the UK is at Tesco?).  
It’s got me thinking about how Tesco (who have a history of amazing and innovative business strategy – the first to sell Petrol at supermarkets in 1973, the first supermarket to introduce a ‘value’ range, the clubcard, online shopping etc…) are trying to tap into and trade on the independent/local, ‘look and feel’. In fact, it’s pretty well known that a small number of large, global brands are the owners of a proliferation of much smaller, consumer brands. Often this association and ownership is ‘hidden’ by what is known as brand architecture. Sometimes these associations manifest themselves as a tiny logo on the back of a product (see Innocent & Copella Apple Juice), and sometimes it’s only a line in an Annual Report (Harris and Hoole).
Branding: Is it deception? Is it lies? One thing is for sure, it’s effective…
Alan Dye From the NB archive: Nincomsoup (and other thoughts)16 October—
Yesterday I was in Old St tube station and I saw Nincomsoup, the independent soup kitchen/café we branded back in 1999. I’m pleased to report that it still looks as fresh today as it did then. It was a very early job for NB and involved lots of collaboration, an exercise in naming, positioning and a visual identity that was worthy of a Design week award. 
Later that day, on my way home, I walked past the new Harris and Hoole coffee shop in Ealing. Back in January, Harris and Hoole were criticised for presenting its shops as independent and local when it was being backed by Tesco, one of the world’s biggest retailers (did you know that £1 in every £8 spent in the UK is at Tesco?).  
It’s got me thinking about how Tesco (who have a history of amazing and innovative business strategy – the first to sell Petrol at supermarkets in 1973, the first supermarket to introduce a ‘value’ range, the clubcard, online shopping etc…) are trying to tap into and trade on the independent/local, ‘look and feel’. In fact, it’s pretty well known that a small number of large, global brands are the owners of a proliferation of much smaller, consumer brands. Often this association and ownership is ‘hidden’ by what is known as brand architecture. Sometimes these associations manifest themselves as a tiny logo on the back of a product (see Innocent & Copella Apple Juice), and sometimes it’s only a line in an Annual Report (Harris and Hoole).
Branding: Is it deception? Is it lies? One thing is for sure, it’s effective…
Alan Dye

From the NB archive: Nincomsoup (and other thoughts)
16 October

Yesterday I was in Old St tube station and I saw Nincomsoup, the independent soup kitchen/café we branded back in 1999. I’m pleased to report that it still looks as fresh today as it did then. It was a very early job for NB and involved lots of collaboration, an exercise in naming, positioning and a visual identity that was worthy of a Design week award.

Later that day, on my way home, I walked past the new Harris and Hoole coffee shop in Ealing. Back in January, Harris and Hoole were criticised for presenting its shops as independent and local when it was being backed by Tesco, one of the world’s biggest retailers (did you know that £1 in every £8 spent in the UK is at Tesco?).  

It’s got me thinking about how Tesco (who have a history of amazing and innovative business strategy – the first to sell Petrol at supermarkets in 1973, the first supermarket to introduce a ‘value’ range, the clubcard, online shopping etc…) are trying to tap into and trade on the independent/local, ‘look and feel’. In fact, it’s pretty well known that a small number of large, global brands are the owners of a proliferation of much smaller, consumer brands. Often this association and ownership is ‘hidden’ by what is known as brand architecture. Sometimes these associations manifest themselves as a tiny logo on the back of a product (see Innocent & Copella Apple Juice), and sometimes it’s only a line in an Annual Report (Harris and Hoole).

Branding: Is it deception? Is it lies? One thing is for sure, it’s effective…

Alan Dye

Whatever10 October—
UAL is a collegiate university formed of six distinct and notorious colleges, some more distinct and notorious than others depending on your chosen field and viewpoint. The colleges all have one thing in common, they need to promote their distinctiveness and difference while at the same time standing together as one.
A year ago we were tasked with providing London College of Communication with marketing material to promote themselves to potential new students parents and commercial partners. One of the issues was that this had to be done within the confines of a new and rigid visual identity system (effectively lowercase Helvetica 65 bold). 
The solution was to challenge the college the way we would if I were a parent, a potential student, a potential commercial partnership:
What exactly is London College of Communication? What does it do? How can you improve my education? Why should I apply here and not another London university? Will I have fun?What will I learn?What about results?Will it help secure my future in the creative industries? 
When we asked these questions, the answers from LCC are manifold and complex, it’s a huge place with lots of courses in different creative arenas, each one is more important than the last. It cannot be captured easily. There is not one LCC - there are many LCCs - there are many answers.
Starting to noodle with this idea led to a solution:
London college of what?
Communication is such a broad term, it means everything and nothing, let’s unpack that and frame it in the question. 
London college of big ideasLondon college of egg, beans and chipsLondon college of endless possibilitiesLondon college of getting your hands dirtyLondon college of whatever you want it to beLondon college of… (you get the idea)
So we provided a simple framework, a platform, a system, an idea.
LCC are still using this work and we have recently been helping to produce fresh materials. These phrases can and are being elaborated upon, married to imagery created by the students they help build strong stories. As the colleges identity evolves, these messages will work - it’s future-proof.
So that’s it; London college of problem solving.
Nick Finney Whatever10 October—
UAL is a collegiate university formed of six distinct and notorious colleges, some more distinct and notorious than others depending on your chosen field and viewpoint. The colleges all have one thing in common, they need to promote their distinctiveness and difference while at the same time standing together as one.
A year ago we were tasked with providing London College of Communication with marketing material to promote themselves to potential new students parents and commercial partners. One of the issues was that this had to be done within the confines of a new and rigid visual identity system (effectively lowercase Helvetica 65 bold). 
The solution was to challenge the college the way we would if I were a parent, a potential student, a potential commercial partnership:
What exactly is London College of Communication? What does it do? How can you improve my education? Why should I apply here and not another London university? Will I have fun?What will I learn?What about results?Will it help secure my future in the creative industries? 
When we asked these questions, the answers from LCC are manifold and complex, it’s a huge place with lots of courses in different creative arenas, each one is more important than the last. It cannot be captured easily. There is not one LCC - there are many LCCs - there are many answers.
Starting to noodle with this idea led to a solution:
London college of what?
Communication is such a broad term, it means everything and nothing, let’s unpack that and frame it in the question. 
London college of big ideasLondon college of egg, beans and chipsLondon college of endless possibilitiesLondon college of getting your hands dirtyLondon college of whatever you want it to beLondon college of… (you get the idea)
So we provided a simple framework, a platform, a system, an idea.
LCC are still using this work and we have recently been helping to produce fresh materials. These phrases can and are being elaborated upon, married to imagery created by the students they help build strong stories. As the colleges identity evolves, these messages will work - it’s future-proof.
So that’s it; London college of problem solving.
Nick Finney Whatever10 October—
UAL is a collegiate university formed of six distinct and notorious colleges, some more distinct and notorious than others depending on your chosen field and viewpoint. The colleges all have one thing in common, they need to promote their distinctiveness and difference while at the same time standing together as one.
A year ago we were tasked with providing London College of Communication with marketing material to promote themselves to potential new students parents and commercial partners. One of the issues was that this had to be done within the confines of a new and rigid visual identity system (effectively lowercase Helvetica 65 bold). 
The solution was to challenge the college the way we would if I were a parent, a potential student, a potential commercial partnership:
What exactly is London College of Communication? What does it do? How can you improve my education? Why should I apply here and not another London university? Will I have fun?What will I learn?What about results?Will it help secure my future in the creative industries? 
When we asked these questions, the answers from LCC are manifold and complex, it’s a huge place with lots of courses in different creative arenas, each one is more important than the last. It cannot be captured easily. There is not one LCC - there are many LCCs - there are many answers.
Starting to noodle with this idea led to a solution:
London college of what?
Communication is such a broad term, it means everything and nothing, let’s unpack that and frame it in the question. 
London college of big ideasLondon college of egg, beans and chipsLondon college of endless possibilitiesLondon college of getting your hands dirtyLondon college of whatever you want it to beLondon college of… (you get the idea)
So we provided a simple framework, a platform, a system, an idea.
LCC are still using this work and we have recently been helping to produce fresh materials. These phrases can and are being elaborated upon, married to imagery created by the students they help build strong stories. As the colleges identity evolves, these messages will work - it’s future-proof.
So that’s it; London college of problem solving.
Nick Finney Whatever10 October—
UAL is a collegiate university formed of six distinct and notorious colleges, some more distinct and notorious than others depending on your chosen field and viewpoint. The colleges all have one thing in common, they need to promote their distinctiveness and difference while at the same time standing together as one.
A year ago we were tasked with providing London College of Communication with marketing material to promote themselves to potential new students parents and commercial partners. One of the issues was that this had to be done within the confines of a new and rigid visual identity system (effectively lowercase Helvetica 65 bold). 
The solution was to challenge the college the way we would if I were a parent, a potential student, a potential commercial partnership:
What exactly is London College of Communication? What does it do? How can you improve my education? Why should I apply here and not another London university? Will I have fun?What will I learn?What about results?Will it help secure my future in the creative industries? 
When we asked these questions, the answers from LCC are manifold and complex, it’s a huge place with lots of courses in different creative arenas, each one is more important than the last. It cannot be captured easily. There is not one LCC - there are many LCCs - there are many answers.
Starting to noodle with this idea led to a solution:
London college of what?
Communication is such a broad term, it means everything and nothing, let’s unpack that and frame it in the question. 
London college of big ideasLondon college of egg, beans and chipsLondon college of endless possibilitiesLondon college of getting your hands dirtyLondon college of whatever you want it to beLondon college of… (you get the idea)
So we provided a simple framework, a platform, a system, an idea.
LCC are still using this work and we have recently been helping to produce fresh materials. These phrases can and are being elaborated upon, married to imagery created by the students they help build strong stories. As the colleges identity evolves, these messages will work - it’s future-proof.
So that’s it; London college of problem solving.
Nick Finney

Whatever
10 October

UAL is a collegiate university formed of six distinct and notorious colleges, some more distinct and notorious than others depending on your chosen field and viewpoint. The colleges all have one thing in common, they need to promote their distinctiveness and difference while at the same time standing together as one.

A year ago we were tasked with providing London College of Communication with marketing material to promote themselves to potential new students parents and commercial partners. One of the issues was that this had to be done within the confines of a new and rigid visual identity system (effectively lowercase Helvetica 65 bold). 

The solution was to challenge the college the way we would if I were a parent, a potential student, a potential commercial partnership:

What exactly is London College of Communication? 
What does it do? 
How can you improve my education? 
Why should I apply here and not another London university? 
Will I have fun?
What will I learn?
What about results?
Will it help secure my future in the creative industries? 

When we asked these questions, the answers from LCC are manifold and complex, it’s a huge place with lots of courses in different creative arenas, each one is more important than the last. It cannot be captured easily. There is not one LCC - there are many LCCs - there are many answers.

Starting to noodle with this idea led to a solution:

London college of what?

Communication is such a broad term, it means everything and nothing, let’s unpack that and frame it in the question. 

London college of big ideas
London college of egg, beans and chips
London college of endless possibilities
London college of getting your hands dirty
London college of whatever you want it to be
London college of… (you get the idea)

So we provided a simple framework, a platform, a system, an idea.

LCC are still using this work and we have recently been helping to produce fresh materials. These phrases can and are being elaborated upon, married to imagery created by the students they help build strong stories. As the colleges identity evolves, these messages will work - it’s future-proof.

So that’s it; London college of problem solving.

Nick Finney

Wallpaper Handmade 20134 October—
In just four editions, Wallpaper’s annual Handmade exhibition has established itself as a must-see at Milan’s Salone del Mobile. Now, for the first time, Handmade is on the move, arriving at London’s Harrods store on 4 October with a spectacular ‘best of’ presentation.
NB were invited to exhibit our ‘Milan l’un grand Milan’ jigsaw, which was commissioned back in 2012. The piece, which is an Italian evolution of our London’s Kerning poster, is on display in the window on the corner of Brompton Road and Hans Crescent - right next to entrance of the tube. 
The jigsaw and map poster are available for purchase in Harrods throughout the exhibition and will be made available in our shop shortly. Wallpaper Handmade 20134 October—
In just four editions, Wallpaper’s annual Handmade exhibition has established itself as a must-see at Milan’s Salone del Mobile. Now, for the first time, Handmade is on the move, arriving at London’s Harrods store on 4 October with a spectacular ‘best of’ presentation.
NB were invited to exhibit our ‘Milan l’un grand Milan’ jigsaw, which was commissioned back in 2012. The piece, which is an Italian evolution of our London’s Kerning poster, is on display in the window on the corner of Brompton Road and Hans Crescent - right next to entrance of the tube. 
The jigsaw and map poster are available for purchase in Harrods throughout the exhibition and will be made available in our shop shortly.

Wallpaper Handmade 2013
4 October

In just four editions, Wallpaper’s annual Handmade exhibition has established itself as a must-see at Milan’s Salone del Mobile. Now, for the first time, Handmade is on the move, arriving at London’s Harrods store on 4 October with a spectacular ‘best of’ presentation.

NB were invited to exhibit our ‘Milan l’un grand Milan’ jigsaw, which was commissioned back in 2012. The piece, which is an Italian evolution of our London’s Kerning poster, is on display in the window on the corner of Brompton Road and Hans Crescent - right next to entrance of the tube. 

The jigsaw and map poster are available for purchase in Harrods throughout the exhibition and will be made available in our shop shortly.