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Germany vs Argentina14 July—After last night’s world cup final, Germany and Argentina are the talk of the studio (sort of). A discussion about which country would win away from the football pitch opened up, so we decided to put our top five ‘penalty takers’ for each country together.Germany:BratwurstArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the Bratwurst (dating back to 1313) is available in over 30 varieties, and was invented as a means of survival during the cold winter months.BauhausArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the infamous German art school has had, and continues to have, a lasting influence on designers for generations.Otl AicherWell known for his work on the ’72 Summer Olympics, his typography, colour and pictograms are a reference point for a number of designers – see our work for John Lewis Broadband.
Blackletter“Developed… as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects” Most people will recognise Blackletter as the typeface used in Gutenberg’s Bible – the first book printed using movable type.BMWAs Michael Wolff writes “From whatever point of view you choose – whether you’re expecting to see a maker of luxury cars or efficient taxis – the BMW experience will provide consistent patterns of details which will lead you into making favourable judgements.”—Argentina:
The TangoNot to be confused with the popular fizzy drink, the Tango is now on a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list, cementing its importance as an intangible cultural asset. It is believed that tango makes people feel more relaxed, sexier, and less depressed, and increases testosterone levels.
WineArgentina is the worlds fifth largest producer of wine, although historically, the country has been more concerned with quantity rather than quality (90% of wine produced is drunk in the country, with the majority of wine produced classed as ‘unexportable.’) The Argentinian wine that does reach our shores is thoroughly enjoyed at NB.
Plastic SurgeryDid you know that Argentina is the world’s capital of plastic surgery? Well, a combination of a plentiful supply of highly skilled surgeons and a devaluing of the Argentine currency has lead to locals and tourists alike flocking to waiting rooms across the nation.
Eva Peron‘Evita’ as she is affectionately known, was the wife of the Argentinian president Juán Peron and the First Lady of Argentina from ‘46 to ‘52. Her story was immortalised by Madonna in the film ‘Evita’ which gave us this classic tune.
Lionel MessiWhilst he wasn’t quite at his best against the Germans, Lionel’s story is an interesting one. The child of a steel worker and a part-time cleaner, Léo was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency aged 11, but turned a weakness into a strength and is now widely regarded as the world’s best player, using his diminutive size and stature to outfox, outmanoeuvre and flummox his opponents.
The result:Germany 1-0 Argentina (after extra time). Germany vs Argentina14 July—After last night’s world cup final, Germany and Argentina are the talk of the studio (sort of). A discussion about which country would win away from the football pitch opened up, so we decided to put our top five ‘penalty takers’ for each country together.Germany:BratwurstArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the Bratwurst (dating back to 1313) is available in over 30 varieties, and was invented as a means of survival during the cold winter months.BauhausArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the infamous German art school has had, and continues to have, a lasting influence on designers for generations.Otl AicherWell known for his work on the ’72 Summer Olympics, his typography, colour and pictograms are a reference point for a number of designers – see our work for John Lewis Broadband.
Blackletter“Developed… as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects” Most people will recognise Blackletter as the typeface used in Gutenberg’s Bible – the first book printed using movable type.BMWAs Michael Wolff writes “From whatever point of view you choose – whether you’re expecting to see a maker of luxury cars or efficient taxis – the BMW experience will provide consistent patterns of details which will lead you into making favourable judgements.”—Argentina:
The TangoNot to be confused with the popular fizzy drink, the Tango is now on a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list, cementing its importance as an intangible cultural asset. It is believed that tango makes people feel more relaxed, sexier, and less depressed, and increases testosterone levels.
WineArgentina is the worlds fifth largest producer of wine, although historically, the country has been more concerned with quantity rather than quality (90% of wine produced is drunk in the country, with the majority of wine produced classed as ‘unexportable.’) The Argentinian wine that does reach our shores is thoroughly enjoyed at NB.
Plastic SurgeryDid you know that Argentina is the world’s capital of plastic surgery? Well, a combination of a plentiful supply of highly skilled surgeons and a devaluing of the Argentine currency has lead to locals and tourists alike flocking to waiting rooms across the nation.
Eva Peron‘Evita’ as she is affectionately known, was the wife of the Argentinian president Juán Peron and the First Lady of Argentina from ‘46 to ‘52. Her story was immortalised by Madonna in the film ‘Evita’ which gave us this classic tune.
Lionel MessiWhilst he wasn’t quite at his best against the Germans, Lionel’s story is an interesting one. The child of a steel worker and a part-time cleaner, Léo was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency aged 11, but turned a weakness into a strength and is now widely regarded as the world’s best player, using his diminutive size and stature to outfox, outmanoeuvre and flummox his opponents.
The result:Germany 1-0 Argentina (after extra time). Germany vs Argentina14 July—After last night’s world cup final, Germany and Argentina are the talk of the studio (sort of). A discussion about which country would win away from the football pitch opened up, so we decided to put our top five ‘penalty takers’ for each country together.Germany:BratwurstArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the Bratwurst (dating back to 1313) is available in over 30 varieties, and was invented as a means of survival during the cold winter months.BauhausArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the infamous German art school has had, and continues to have, a lasting influence on designers for generations.Otl AicherWell known for his work on the ’72 Summer Olympics, his typography, colour and pictograms are a reference point for a number of designers – see our work for John Lewis Broadband.
Blackletter“Developed… as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects” Most people will recognise Blackletter as the typeface used in Gutenberg’s Bible – the first book printed using movable type.BMWAs Michael Wolff writes “From whatever point of view you choose – whether you’re expecting to see a maker of luxury cars or efficient taxis – the BMW experience will provide consistent patterns of details which will lead you into making favourable judgements.”—Argentina:
The TangoNot to be confused with the popular fizzy drink, the Tango is now on a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list, cementing its importance as an intangible cultural asset. It is believed that tango makes people feel more relaxed, sexier, and less depressed, and increases testosterone levels.
WineArgentina is the worlds fifth largest producer of wine, although historically, the country has been more concerned with quantity rather than quality (90% of wine produced is drunk in the country, with the majority of wine produced classed as ‘unexportable.’) The Argentinian wine that does reach our shores is thoroughly enjoyed at NB.
Plastic SurgeryDid you know that Argentina is the world’s capital of plastic surgery? Well, a combination of a plentiful supply of highly skilled surgeons and a devaluing of the Argentine currency has lead to locals and tourists alike flocking to waiting rooms across the nation.
Eva Peron‘Evita’ as she is affectionately known, was the wife of the Argentinian president Juán Peron and the First Lady of Argentina from ‘46 to ‘52. Her story was immortalised by Madonna in the film ‘Evita’ which gave us this classic tune.
Lionel MessiWhilst he wasn’t quite at his best against the Germans, Lionel’s story is an interesting one. The child of a steel worker and a part-time cleaner, Léo was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency aged 11, but turned a weakness into a strength and is now widely regarded as the world’s best player, using his diminutive size and stature to outfox, outmanoeuvre and flummox his opponents.
The result:Germany 1-0 Argentina (after extra time). Germany vs Argentina14 July—After last night’s world cup final, Germany and Argentina are the talk of the studio (sort of). A discussion about which country would win away from the football pitch opened up, so we decided to put our top five ‘penalty takers’ for each country together.Germany:BratwurstArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the Bratwurst (dating back to 1313) is available in over 30 varieties, and was invented as a means of survival during the cold winter months.BauhausArgued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the infamous German art school has had, and continues to have, a lasting influence on designers for generations.Otl AicherWell known for his work on the ’72 Summer Olympics, his typography, colour and pictograms are a reference point for a number of designers – see our work for John Lewis Broadband.
Blackletter“Developed… as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects” Most people will recognise Blackletter as the typeface used in Gutenberg’s Bible – the first book printed using movable type.BMWAs Michael Wolff writes “From whatever point of view you choose – whether you’re expecting to see a maker of luxury cars or efficient taxis – the BMW experience will provide consistent patterns of details which will lead you into making favourable judgements.”—Argentina:
The TangoNot to be confused with the popular fizzy drink, the Tango is now on a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list, cementing its importance as an intangible cultural asset. It is believed that tango makes people feel more relaxed, sexier, and less depressed, and increases testosterone levels.
WineArgentina is the worlds fifth largest producer of wine, although historically, the country has been more concerned with quantity rather than quality (90% of wine produced is drunk in the country, with the majority of wine produced classed as ‘unexportable.’) The Argentinian wine that does reach our shores is thoroughly enjoyed at NB.
Plastic SurgeryDid you know that Argentina is the world’s capital of plastic surgery? Well, a combination of a plentiful supply of highly skilled surgeons and a devaluing of the Argentine currency has lead to locals and tourists alike flocking to waiting rooms across the nation.
Eva Peron‘Evita’ as she is affectionately known, was the wife of the Argentinian president Juán Peron and the First Lady of Argentina from ‘46 to ‘52. Her story was immortalised by Madonna in the film ‘Evita’ which gave us this classic tune.
Lionel MessiWhilst he wasn’t quite at his best against the Germans, Lionel’s story is an interesting one. The child of a steel worker and a part-time cleaner, Léo was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency aged 11, but turned a weakness into a strength and is now widely regarded as the world’s best player, using his diminutive size and stature to outfox, outmanoeuvre and flummox his opponents.
The result:Germany 1-0 Argentina (after extra time).

Germany vs Argentina
14 July


After last night’s world cup final, Germany and Argentina are the talk of the studio (sort of). A discussion about which country would win away from the football pitch opened up, so we decided to put our top five ‘penalty takers’ for each country together.

Germany:

Bratwurst
Argued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the Bratwurst (dating back to 1313) is available in over 30 varieties, and was invented as a means of survival during the cold winter months.

Bauhaus
Argued by some in the studio to be Germany’s biggest gift to the world, the infamous German art school has had, and continues to have, a lasting influence on designers for generations.

Otl Aicher
Well known for his work on the ’72 Summer Olympics, his typography, colour and pictograms are a reference point for a number of designers – see our work for John Lewis Broadband.

Blackletter
“Developed… as an increasingly literate 12th-century Europe required new books in many different subjects” Most people will recognise Blackletter as the typeface used in Gutenberg’s Bible – the first book printed using movable type.

BMW
As Michael Wolff writes “From whatever point of view you choose – whether you’re expecting to see a maker of luxury cars or efficient taxis – the BMW experience will provide consistent patterns of details which will lead you into making favourable judgements.”


Argentina:

The Tango
Not to be confused with the popular fizzy drink, the Tango is now on a UNESCO intangible cultural heritage list, cementing its importance as an intangible cultural asset. It is believed that tango makes people feel more relaxed, sexier, and less depressed, and increases testosterone levels.

Wine
Argentina is the worlds fifth largest producer of wine, although historically, the country has been more concerned with quantity rather than quality (90% of wine produced is drunk in the country, with the majority of wine produced classed as ‘unexportable.’) The Argentinian wine that does reach our shores is thoroughly enjoyed at NB.

Plastic Surgery
Did you know that Argentina is the world’s capital of plastic surgery? Well, a combination of a plentiful supply of highly skilled surgeons and a devaluing of the Argentine currency has lead to locals and tourists alike flocking to waiting rooms across the nation.

Eva Peron
‘Evita’ as she is affectionately known, was the wife of the Argentinian president Juán Peron and the First Lady of Argentina from ‘46 to ‘52. Her story was immortalised by Madonna in the film ‘Evita’ which gave us this classic tune.

Lionel Messi
Whilst he wasn’t quite at his best against the Germans, Lionel’s story is an interesting one. The child of a steel worker and a part-time cleaner, Léo was diagnosed with growth hormone deficiency aged 11, but turned a weakness into a strength and is now widely regarded as the world’s best player, using his diminutive size and stature to outfox, outmanoeuvre and flummox his opponents.

The result:
Germany 1-0 Argentina (after extra time).

Yorkshire in Yellow7 July—
To celebrate the famous Tour de France starting on UK shores, Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery is hosting an exhibition of ‘yellow jerseys’ designed by a whole host of well known designers. In total there are 111 designs, to mark the 111 years of the Le Tour. 
Our submission, left, is also available for purchase in the form of a t-shirt from here. The Yorkshire in Yellow exhibition runs until September 7th and is a partnership between Made North and Museums Sheffield.

Yorkshire in Yellow
7 July

To celebrate the famous Tour de France starting on UK shores, Sheffield’s Millennium Gallery is hosting an exhibition of ‘yellow jerseys’ designed by a whole host of well known designers. In total there are 111 designs, to mark the 111 years of the Le Tour.

Our submission, left, is also available for purchase in the form of a t-shirt from hereThe Yorkshire in Yellow exhibition runs until September 7th and is a partnership between Made North and Museums Sheffield.

Making a Little Revolution17 June—
Creating a theatre production image can be tricky – lots of creative stakeholders on the production side and a complex and challenging narrative to reduce down into a single image that has a very broad appeal. 
Armed with a short synopsis of the Almeida’s latest production, Little Revolution, and following some discussion, we hit upon the idea of smashing a mug with a brick. The brick throwing is a nice nod to the theme of rioting, and the overall scene has a feeling of drama and tension, but what mug should we smash? And where can we buy one single brick?
After lots of deliberation and a few scouting trips to John Lewis we came back with 15 beautiful, symbolic china mugs from some well known designers and a handful of keep calm and carry on mugs from one of those tacky souvenir shops (we were particularly looking forward to smashing these). However, after a quick conversation with photographer, Bruno Drummond, we realised 15 wasn’t going to be nearly enough mugs. 
After some creative mug shopping (buying cheap ‘stunt doubles’ to stand in for the more expensive mugs in test shots) we eventually had closer to 100 ready for the big day. By then we had managed to acquire a brick (don’t ask), and an industrial size bucket of tea too. 
Some clever rigging, expert timing, a lot of trial and error and we had some amazing stills to choose from - and a lot of mopping up to do. 
A little bit of a tidy up in post production and with the addition of some expressive typography, we have our final image.
You can catch Little Revolution at the Almeida from 26 August. Thanks to Bruno and his team for all the hard work, we had a smashing time. Making a Little Revolution17 June—
Creating a theatre production image can be tricky – lots of creative stakeholders on the production side and a complex and challenging narrative to reduce down into a single image that has a very broad appeal. 
Armed with a short synopsis of the Almeida’s latest production, Little Revolution, and following some discussion, we hit upon the idea of smashing a mug with a brick. The brick throwing is a nice nod to the theme of rioting, and the overall scene has a feeling of drama and tension, but what mug should we smash? And where can we buy one single brick?
After lots of deliberation and a few scouting trips to John Lewis we came back with 15 beautiful, symbolic china mugs from some well known designers and a handful of keep calm and carry on mugs from one of those tacky souvenir shops (we were particularly looking forward to smashing these). However, after a quick conversation with photographer, Bruno Drummond, we realised 15 wasn’t going to be nearly enough mugs. 
After some creative mug shopping (buying cheap ‘stunt doubles’ to stand in for the more expensive mugs in test shots) we eventually had closer to 100 ready for the big day. By then we had managed to acquire a brick (don’t ask), and an industrial size bucket of tea too. 
Some clever rigging, expert timing, a lot of trial and error and we had some amazing stills to choose from - and a lot of mopping up to do. 
A little bit of a tidy up in post production and with the addition of some expressive typography, we have our final image.
You can catch Little Revolution at the Almeida from 26 August. Thanks to Bruno and his team for all the hard work, we had a smashing time. Making a Little Revolution17 June—
Creating a theatre production image can be tricky – lots of creative stakeholders on the production side and a complex and challenging narrative to reduce down into a single image that has a very broad appeal. 
Armed with a short synopsis of the Almeida’s latest production, Little Revolution, and following some discussion, we hit upon the idea of smashing a mug with a brick. The brick throwing is a nice nod to the theme of rioting, and the overall scene has a feeling of drama and tension, but what mug should we smash? And where can we buy one single brick?
After lots of deliberation and a few scouting trips to John Lewis we came back with 15 beautiful, symbolic china mugs from some well known designers and a handful of keep calm and carry on mugs from one of those tacky souvenir shops (we were particularly looking forward to smashing these). However, after a quick conversation with photographer, Bruno Drummond, we realised 15 wasn’t going to be nearly enough mugs. 
After some creative mug shopping (buying cheap ‘stunt doubles’ to stand in for the more expensive mugs in test shots) we eventually had closer to 100 ready for the big day. By then we had managed to acquire a brick (don’t ask), and an industrial size bucket of tea too. 
Some clever rigging, expert timing, a lot of trial and error and we had some amazing stills to choose from - and a lot of mopping up to do. 
A little bit of a tidy up in post production and with the addition of some expressive typography, we have our final image.
You can catch Little Revolution at the Almeida from 26 August. Thanks to Bruno and his team for all the hard work, we had a smashing time. Making a Little Revolution17 June—
Creating a theatre production image can be tricky – lots of creative stakeholders on the production side and a complex and challenging narrative to reduce down into a single image that has a very broad appeal. 
Armed with a short synopsis of the Almeida’s latest production, Little Revolution, and following some discussion, we hit upon the idea of smashing a mug with a brick. The brick throwing is a nice nod to the theme of rioting, and the overall scene has a feeling of drama and tension, but what mug should we smash? And where can we buy one single brick?
After lots of deliberation and a few scouting trips to John Lewis we came back with 15 beautiful, symbolic china mugs from some well known designers and a handful of keep calm and carry on mugs from one of those tacky souvenir shops (we were particularly looking forward to smashing these). However, after a quick conversation with photographer, Bruno Drummond, we realised 15 wasn’t going to be nearly enough mugs. 
After some creative mug shopping (buying cheap ‘stunt doubles’ to stand in for the more expensive mugs in test shots) we eventually had closer to 100 ready for the big day. By then we had managed to acquire a brick (don’t ask), and an industrial size bucket of tea too. 
Some clever rigging, expert timing, a lot of trial and error and we had some amazing stills to choose from - and a lot of mopping up to do. 
A little bit of a tidy up in post production and with the addition of some expressive typography, we have our final image.
You can catch Little Revolution at the Almeida from 26 August. Thanks to Bruno and his team for all the hard work, we had a smashing time.

Making a Little Revolution
17 June

Creating a theatre production image can be tricky – lots of creative stakeholders on the production side and a complex and challenging narrative to reduce down into a single image that has a very broad appeal. 

Armed with a short synopsis of the Almeida’s latest production, Little Revolution, and following some discussion, we hit upon the idea of smashing a mug with a brick. The brick throwing is a nice nod to the theme of rioting, and the overall scene has a feeling of drama and tension, but what mug should we smash? And where can we buy one single brick?

After lots of deliberation and a few scouting trips to John Lewis we came back with 15 beautiful, symbolic china mugs from some well known designers and a handful of keep calm and carry on mugs from one of those tacky souvenir shops (we were particularly looking forward to smashing these). However, after a quick conversation with photographer, Bruno Drummond, we realised 15 wasn’t going to be nearly enough mugs. 

After some creative mug shopping (buying cheap ‘stunt doubles’ to stand in for the more expensive mugs in test shots) we eventually had closer to 100 ready for the big day. By then we had managed to acquire a brick (don’t ask), and an industrial size bucket of tea too. 

Some clever rigging, expert timing, a lot of trial and error and we had some amazing stills to choose from - and a lot of mopping up to do. 

A little bit of a tidy up in post production and with the addition of some expressive typography, we have our final image.

You can catch Little Revolution at the Almeida from 26 August. Thanks to Bruno and his team for all the hard work, we had a smashing time.

JLAB1 May—
We were excited to be involved in creating an identity for JLab, a new venture from John Lewis in collaboration with Stuart Marks.
As part of the retailer’s 150th anniversary, it will choose five startups to take part in the programme over the summer. Whilst on the JLab programme, startups will develop their products, supported by a team of John Lewis leaders and external mentors.
At the end of the programme, JLab will select a winner and back it with a £100,000 investment. If the project is a success the idea will be introduced across its 40 stores.
The simple visual identity we designed was enough to get the programme up and running and will be evolved and expanded over the coming months. 
You can read more about JLab over on the Guardian and you can see more of our work with John Lewis here and here.

JLAB
1 May

We were excited to be involved in creating an identity for JLab, a new venture from John Lewis in collaboration with Stuart Marks.

As part of the retailer’s 150th anniversary, it will choose five startups to take part in the programme over the summer. Whilst on the JLab programme, startups will develop their products, supported by a team of John Lewis leaders and external mentors.

At the end of the programme, JLab will select a winner and back it with a £100,000 investment. If the project is a success the idea will be introduced across its 40 stores.

The simple visual identity we designed was enough to get the programme up and running and will be evolved and expanded over the coming months. 

You can read more about JLab over on the Guardian and you can see more of our work with John Lewis here and here.

Control or release?3 April—
Recently, someone asked me: 
‘To build a successful brand, is it better to control every aspect of the brand, or to encourage people to adopt it and adapt it?’
This is - on the surface - a pretty straightforward question, but I think the answer is much less so. 
For starters, we need to work out exactly what those phrases mean. 
For arguments sake, let’s agree that ‘controlling every aspect of the brand’ is about quality control and keeping standards high. 
Let’s also agree that the ‘adopt and adapt’ approach is all about flexibility, adapting and reacting. 
Firstly, ‘adopt and adapt’ feels creative and exciting. It’s about putting a brand into the hands of others. This could lead to improvements in both the economic and social value of a brand. So that’s a real positive. Or it could go tragically wrong. Which isn’t a real positive.
We all know one size doesn’t fit all. There is no single answer and maybe there should be a difference in how we look after product brands compared to service brands. Allow me to explain…
When getting a new product brand off the ground - let’s pretend we’re launching Coke – consistency trumps flexibility. We would want our customers to enjoy the same type of experience, consistently, wherever and however they use the product (Coke = refreshment). The more consistent this experience is, the stronger that brand becomes in the mind. 
On the other hand, a service brand – let’s pretend we’re launching FedEx – adaptability and flexibility trump consistency. At the very least we would expect a reliable service, but that personal touch and going ‘above and beyond’ to meet customer’s needs separate the great from the good in this area. 
This question also highlights the changing role of brand managers and brand consultancies – moving away from visual identity systems and ‘brand police’ to a job that is all about establishing, enthusing and communicating the brand’s values at every available opportunity. I think most of the brand mangers I’ve come across at NB would support this observation. 
Apple, for want of a better example, offer a range of products and services that are of a consistent quality. From Chicago to Singapore, there is a consistency and coherence to the brand’s visual identity, packaging, materials, advertising, service and so on.
However, one could argue (and I am) that without a certain Mr Job’s drive to develop, innovate and adapt - and forcing that spirit of innovation into his employees - Apple would not have invented those products in the first place, or be the brand it is now. 
Without wanting to lower the tone, the answer to the question is a bit like farting in a crowded room; you need to hold tight and let go.  
Tom Moloney

Control or release?
3 April

Recently, someone asked me: 

‘To build a successful brand, is it better to control every aspect of the brand, or to encourage people to adopt it and adapt it?’

This is - on the surface - a pretty straightforward question, but I think the answer is much less so. 

For starters, we need to work out exactly what those phrases mean. 

For arguments sake, let’s agree that ‘controlling every aspect of the brand’ is about quality control and keeping standards high. 

Let’s also agree that the ‘adopt and adapt’ approach is all about flexibility, adapting and reacting. 

Firstly, ‘adopt and adapt’ feels creative and exciting. It’s about putting a brand into the hands of others. This could lead to improvements in both the economic and social value of a brand. So that’s a real positive. Or it could go tragically wrong. Which isn’t a real positive.

We all know one size doesn’t fit all. There is no single answer and maybe there should be a difference in how we look after product brands compared to service brands. Allow me to explain…

When getting a new product brand off the ground - let’s pretend we’re launching Coke – consistency trumps flexibility. We would want our customers to enjoy the same type of experience, consistently, wherever and however they use the product (Coke = refreshment). The more consistent this experience is, the stronger that brand becomes in the mind. 

On the other hand, a service brand – let’s pretend we’re launching FedEx – adaptability and flexibility trump consistency. At the very least we would expect a reliable service, but that personal touch and going ‘above and beyond’ to meet customer’s needs separate the great from the good in this area. 

This question also highlights the changing role of brand managers and brand consultancies – moving away from visual identity systems and ‘brand police’ to a job that is all about establishing, enthusing and communicating the brand’s values at every available opportunity. I think most of the brand mangers I’ve come across at NB would support this observation. 

Apple, for want of a better example, offer a range of products and services that are of a consistent quality. From Chicago to Singapore, there is a consistency and coherence to the brand’s visual identity, packaging, materials, advertising, service and so on.

However, one could argue (and I am) that without a certain Mr Job’s drive to develop, innovate and adapt - and forcing that spirit of innovation into his employees - Apple would not have invented those products in the first place, or be the brand it is now. 

Without wanting to lower the tone, the answer to the question is a bit like farting in a crowded room; you need to hold tight and let go.  

Tom Moloney

Enjoy the show3 April—
As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 
The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”
One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 
We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image. 
This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!
You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here.  Enjoy the show3 April—
As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 
The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”
One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 
We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image. 
This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!
You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here. 

Enjoy the show
3 April

As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 

The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”

One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 

We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image.

This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!

You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here. 

This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food

This Year 2014
19 February

Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.

Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.

Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 

This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 

Images (from top down)

Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transport
George McCalllum predicts the future of housing
Jan Buchczik predicts the future of work
Ryan Todd predicts the future of food

201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer.

2013
15 January

Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.

It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.

In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.

We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world.
At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.

2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.

Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  

Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer.

Youth at Risk (and Michael Wolff)3 January—
Over the years Nick and I have collaborated on a number of varied, exciting and eclectic projects with Michael Wolff. All have been incredible journeys, from the brief through to the end result, the people we’ve met and the joy and ease of working with such an incredibly experienced, intuitive thinker. 
Together we have rebranded INSEAD, the Business School for the World,worked extensively across all communication platforms with Mothercareand developed a very successful campaign for University of Oxford. 
More recently we have named and branded two Russian Banks, the latest being an innovative online service for Russian entrepreneurs. 
So when I was invited by Michael to witness a Youth at Risk workshop with the writer Tom Lynham I just couldn’t turn it down. I went with an open mind and no expectations. What I experienced in the next couple of hours completely changed my perspective on life and made me realize just how lucky I have been. I left heart broken, inspired and full of admiration for the amazing volunteers who were responsible for changing the direction of these kids’ lives. 
These amazing people work their no nonsense tough love with these scared, angry, hurt, lonely teenagers who have nothing, literally nothing. These kids who have experienced no love in their life and have volunteered themselves as a last resort to help themselves. 
Michael is a patron of Youth at Risk and wanted to NB to help tell their story in the most compelling and memorable way as possible. Our idea is simple; a butterfly – a metaphor for a new, bright and colourful life.
To help us achieve this we commissioned artist Patrick Thomas. His iconic ‘graffiti’ style seemed perfect and matched the organisation’s no-nonsense approach.  
If you have a moment I urge you to watch this short clip about Youth at Risk and the Birmingham Royal Ballet.  

Alan Dye

Youth at Risk (and Michael Wolff)
January

Over the years Nick and I have collaborated on a number of varied, exciting and eclectic projects with Michael Wolff. All have been incredible journeys, from the brief through to the end result, the people we’ve met and the joy and ease of working with such an incredibly experienced, intuitive thinker. 

Together we have rebranded INSEAD, the Business School for the World,
worked extensively across all communication platforms with Mothercare
and developed a very successful campaign for University of Oxford

More recently we have named and branded two Russian Banks, the latest being an innovative online service for Russian entrepreneurs

So when I was invited by Michael to witness a Youth at Risk workshop with the writer Tom Lynham I just couldn’t turn it down. I went with an open mind and no expectations. What I experienced in the next couple of hours completely changed my perspective on life and made me realize just how lucky I have been. I left heart broken, inspired and full of admiration for the amazing volunteers who were responsible for changing the direction of these kids’ lives. 

These amazing people work their no nonsense tough love with these scared, angry, hurt, lonely teenagers who have nothing, literally nothing. These kids who have experienced no love in their life and have volunteered themselves as a last resort to help themselves. 

Michael is a patron of Youth at Risk and wanted to NB to help tell their story in the most compelling and memorable way as possible. Our idea is simple; a butterfly – a metaphor for a new, bright and colourful life.

To help us achieve this we commissioned artist Patrick Thomas. His iconic ‘graffiti’ style seemed perfect and matched the organisation’s no-nonsense approach.  

If you have a moment I urge you to watch this short clip about Youth at Risk and the Birmingham Royal Ballet.  

Alan Dye

Happy Christmas Stamps19 December—
In June 2013 Royal Mail launched its third national competition to design Christmas stamps (the first was all the way back in 1966). Children aged 4-11 were invited to create an image around the theme ‘What does Christmas mean to you?’ We were asked to design the supporting collateral – stamp packs, first day covers, envelopes, hand stamps etc – the perfect chance to get our hands dirty and meddle in some good old fashioned finger painting. (You can see more of our work with the Royal Mail over here).
We’d also like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very merry Christmas and a happy new year. Here’s to a happy and successful 2014.

Happy Christmas Stamps
19 December

In June 2013 Royal Mail launched its third national competition to design Christmas stamps (the first was all the way back in 1966). Children aged 4-11 were invited to create an image around the theme ‘What does Christmas mean to you?’ We were asked to design the supporting collateral – stamp packs, first day covers, envelopes, hand stamps etc – the perfect chance to get our hands dirty and meddle in some good old fashioned finger painting. (You can see more of our work with the Royal Mail over here).

We’d also like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very merry Christmas and a happy new year. Here’s to a happy and successful 2014.