Blog

Control or release?3 April—
Recently, someone asked me: 
‘To build a successful brand, is it better to control every aspect of the brand, or to encourage people to adopt it and adapt it?’
This is - on the surface - a pretty straightforward question, but I think the answer is much less so. 
For starters, we need to work out exactly what those phrases mean. 
For arguments sake, let’s agree that ‘controlling every aspect of the brand’ is about quality control and keeping standards high. 
Let’s also agree that the ‘adopt and adapt’ approach is all about flexibility, adapting and reacting. 
Firstly, ‘adopt and adapt’ feels creative and exciting. It’s about putting a brand into the hands of others. This could lead to improvements in both the economic and social value of a brand. So that’s a real positive. Or it could go tragically wrong. Which isn’t a real positive.
We all know one size doesn’t fit all. There is no single answer and maybe there should be a difference in how we look after product brands compared to service brands. Allow me to explain…
When getting a new product brand off the ground - let’s pretend we’re launching Coke – consistency trumps flexibility. We would want our customers to enjoy the same type of experience, consistently, wherever and however they use the product (Coke = refreshment). The more consistent this experience is, the stronger that brand becomes in the mind. 
On the other hand, a service brand – let’s pretend we’re launching FedEx – adaptability and flexibility trump consistency. At the very least we would expect a reliable service, but that personal touch and going ‘above and beyond’ to meet customer’s needs separate the great from the good in this area. 
This question also highlights the changing role of brand managers and brand consultancies – moving away from visual identity systems and ‘brand police’ to a job that is all about establishing, enthusing and communicating the brand’s values at every available opportunity. I think most of the brand mangers I’ve come across at NB would support this observation. 
Apple, for want of a better example, offer a range of products and services that are of a consistent quality. From Chicago to Singapore, there is a consistency and coherence to the brand’s visual identity, packaging, materials, advertising, service and so on.
However, one could argue (and I am) that without a certain Mr Job’s drive to develop, innovate and adapt - and forcing that spirit of innovation into his employees - Apple would not have invented those products in the first place, or be the brand it is now. 
Without wanting to lower the tone, the answer to the question is a bit like farting in a crowded room; you need to hold tight and let go.  
Tom Moloney

Control or release?
3 April

Recently, someone asked me: 

‘To build a successful brand, is it better to control every aspect of the brand, or to encourage people to adopt it and adapt it?’

This is - on the surface - a pretty straightforward question, but I think the answer is much less so. 

For starters, we need to work out exactly what those phrases mean. 

For arguments sake, let’s agree that ‘controlling every aspect of the brand’ is about quality control and keeping standards high. 

Let’s also agree that the ‘adopt and adapt’ approach is all about flexibility, adapting and reacting. 

Firstly, ‘adopt and adapt’ feels creative and exciting. It’s about putting a brand into the hands of others. This could lead to improvements in both the economic and social value of a brand. So that’s a real positive. Or it could go tragically wrong. Which isn’t a real positive.

We all know one size doesn’t fit all. There is no single answer and maybe there should be a difference in how we look after product brands compared to service brands. Allow me to explain…

When getting a new product brand off the ground - let’s pretend we’re launching Coke – consistency trumps flexibility. We would want our customers to enjoy the same type of experience, consistently, wherever and however they use the product (Coke = refreshment). The more consistent this experience is, the stronger that brand becomes in the mind. 

On the other hand, a service brand – let’s pretend we’re launching FedEx – adaptability and flexibility trump consistency. At the very least we would expect a reliable service, but that personal touch and going ‘above and beyond’ to meet customer’s needs separate the great from the good in this area. 

This question also highlights the changing role of brand managers and brand consultancies – moving away from visual identity systems and ‘brand police’ to a job that is all about establishing, enthusing and communicating the brand’s values at every available opportunity. I think most of the brand mangers I’ve come across at NB would support this observation. 

Apple, for want of a better example, offer a range of products and services that are of a consistent quality. From Chicago to Singapore, there is a consistency and coherence to the brand’s visual identity, packaging, materials, advertising, service and so on.

However, one could argue (and I am) that without a certain Mr Job’s drive to develop, innovate and adapt - and forcing that spirit of innovation into his employees - Apple would not have invented those products in the first place, or be the brand it is now. 

Without wanting to lower the tone, the answer to the question is a bit like farting in a crowded room; you need to hold tight and let go.  

Tom Moloney

Enjoy the show3 April—
As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 
The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”
One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 
We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image. 
This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!
You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here.  Enjoy the show3 April—
As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 
The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”
One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 
We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image. 
This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!
You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here. 

Enjoy the show
3 April

As part of our recent rebrand of the Almeida Theatre we’ve had the opportunity to design imagery for what have become some of the Almeida’s most successful shows. 

The latest production, which opens very soon, is the world premiere of King Charles III – a ‘future history’ play by Mike Bartlett.  As described on the Almeida website, this “…controversial new play explores the people beneath the crowns, the unwritten rules of our democracy, and the conscience of Britain’s most famous family.”

One of the themes for our brief was around censorship of the press - hence the gag over Charles’s mouth. This censorship theme strangely came back to haunt us when sending our design (top image) to be printed and installed in and around Angel and Highbury & Islington tube stations. We were informed that our design had been “disapproved, in accordance with tfl’s guidelines, because it contains an image of a living member of the Royal Family (and in particular, as His Highness is represented as “gagged”).” 

We got round the problem by pixelating the entire face, which works equally well - if not better - than the original image.

This isn’t the first time we’ve had a scrape with controversy, our D&AD New Blood Suicides campaign received acclaim and scorn in equal measure, but it is the first time we’ve been in trouble for gagging a member of the royal family!

You can book tickets to the production here, read an interesting article about the future history play here and see more of our work with Almeida here. 

This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food This Year 201419 February—
Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.
Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.
Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 
This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 
Images (from top down): 
Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transportGeorge McCalllum predicts the future of housingJan Buchczik predicts the future of workRyan Todd predicts the future of food

This Year 2014
19 February

Faced with the perennial challenge of producing a Christmas card, NB decide to concentrate on the year ahead instead. The aim is to create an annual limited edition piece to send out to friends and clients, which might outlive the standard designer Christmas card.

Each year we try to pick a topical theme and collaborate with a new group of creatives, working in a different medium to the previous year.

Back in 1964, the American author, Isaac Asimov made a series of predictions about 2014. They touched on a wide range of subjects including transport, food, work and the home. 

This year, the future doesn’t seem so far away. The world of 2064 will be very different, so we’ve challenged four friends to make some predictions of their own. Jan Buchczik, Margaret Calvert, George McCallum and Ryan Todd have all created a limited edition artwork inspired by Asimov’s predictions. 

Images (from top down)

Margaret Calvert predicts the future of transport
George McCalllum predicts the future of housing
Jan Buchczik predicts the future of work
Ryan Todd predicts the future of food

201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer. 201315 January—
Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.
It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.
In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.  We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world. At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.
2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.
Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  
Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer.

2013
15 January

Before we let the irresistible pull of the new year consume us completely, we’ve allowed ourselves one last fleeting look back at 2013.

It was a busy year for NB that kicked off with the launch of our 150 years of the London Underground stamp set, closely followed by the redesign of the Typocircle website and an exclusive launch event for the Chivas Pininfarina partnership.

In the first half of the year we were busy working on The Secret Garden theme for Crabtree and Evelyn, and spending lots of time in Russia working with the talented team at Knopka.

We enjoyed picking up awards for our 5 big names in type, University of Oxford, This Year, and the Chivas Made for Gentleman partnership with Patrick Grant which had just started to appear in retailers around the world.
At the same time, our ‘Get to know More’ cards debuted at the CASE conference in Manchester.

2013 also saw the launch of the NB shop, our typographic map and puzzle of Milan exhibiting at Harrods and then in Miami, and the production of our gold plated #OMG bracelet for London Design Festival.

Having created the identity, we enjoyed the D&AD White Pencil Symposium as well as It’s Nice That’s Here 2013 and a host of interesting Typocircle talks (we know the Chairman). Lynda Relph Knight’s Design Dinners are always good fun, and so was working on the Tabletalk magazine that accompanied them.  

Our campaign for LCC was well received and we enjoyed creating a limited edition posters for Glory Glory and Inside Out San Francisco. We hosted talks to student groups from a number of universities and visited Moscow, Stockholm, Switzerland and Suffolk to name but four.

Of course there were plenty of things that we couldn’t mention here, so keep an eye on our twitter (@nbstudio - there’s a prize for our 5,000th follower) and the NB blog for news as we charge into 2014 looking forward to all it has to offer.

Youth at Risk (and Michael Wolff)3 January—
Over the years Nick and I have collaborated on a number of varied, exciting and eclectic projects with Michael Wolff. All have been incredible journeys, from the brief through to the end result, the people we’ve met and the joy and ease of working with such an incredibly experienced, intuitive thinker. 
Together we have rebranded INSEAD, the Business School for the World,worked extensively across all communication platforms with Mothercareand developed a very successful campaign for University of Oxford. 
More recently we have named and branded two Russian Banks, the latest being an innovative online service for Russian entrepreneurs. 
So when I was invited by Michael to witness a Youth at Risk workshop with the writer Tom Lynham I just couldn’t turn it down. I went with an open mind and no expectations. What I experienced in the next couple of hours completely changed my perspective on life and made me realize just how lucky I have been. I left heart broken, inspired and full of admiration for the amazing volunteers who were responsible for changing the direction of these kids’ lives. 
These amazing people work their no nonsense tough love with these scared, angry, hurt, lonely teenagers who have nothing, literally nothing. These kids who have experienced no love in their life and have volunteered themselves as a last resort to help themselves. 
Michael is a patron of Youth at Risk and wanted to NB to help tell their story in the most compelling and memorable way as possible. Our idea is simple; a butterfly – a metaphor for a new, bright and colourful life.
To help us achieve this we commissioned artist Patrick Thomas. His iconic ‘graffiti’ style seemed perfect and matched the organisation’s no-nonsense approach.  
If you have a moment I urge you to watch this short clip about Youth at Risk and the Birmingham Royal Ballet.  

Alan Dye

Youth at Risk (and Michael Wolff)
January

Over the years Nick and I have collaborated on a number of varied, exciting and eclectic projects with Michael Wolff. All have been incredible journeys, from the brief through to the end result, the people we’ve met and the joy and ease of working with such an incredibly experienced, intuitive thinker. 

Together we have rebranded INSEAD, the Business School for the World,
worked extensively across all communication platforms with Mothercare
and developed a very successful campaign for University of Oxford

More recently we have named and branded two Russian Banks, the latest being an innovative online service for Russian entrepreneurs

So when I was invited by Michael to witness a Youth at Risk workshop with the writer Tom Lynham I just couldn’t turn it down. I went with an open mind and no expectations. What I experienced in the next couple of hours completely changed my perspective on life and made me realize just how lucky I have been. I left heart broken, inspired and full of admiration for the amazing volunteers who were responsible for changing the direction of these kids’ lives. 

These amazing people work their no nonsense tough love with these scared, angry, hurt, lonely teenagers who have nothing, literally nothing. These kids who have experienced no love in their life and have volunteered themselves as a last resort to help themselves. 

Michael is a patron of Youth at Risk and wanted to NB to help tell their story in the most compelling and memorable way as possible. Our idea is simple; a butterfly – a metaphor for a new, bright and colourful life.

To help us achieve this we commissioned artist Patrick Thomas. His iconic ‘graffiti’ style seemed perfect and matched the organisation’s no-nonsense approach.  

If you have a moment I urge you to watch this short clip about Youth at Risk and the Birmingham Royal Ballet.  

Alan Dye

Happy Christmas Stamps19 December—
In June 2013 Royal Mail launched its third national competition to design Christmas stamps (the first was all the way back in 1966). Children aged 4-11 were invited to create an image around the theme ‘What does Christmas mean to you?’ We were asked to design the supporting collateral – stamp packs, first day covers, envelopes, hand stamps etc – the perfect chance to get our hands dirty and meddle in some good old fashioned finger painting. (You can see more of our work with the Royal Mail over here).
We’d also like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very merry Christmas and a happy new year. Here’s to a happy and successful 2014.

Happy Christmas Stamps
19 December

In June 2013 Royal Mail launched its third national competition to design Christmas stamps (the first was all the way back in 1966). Children aged 4-11 were invited to create an image around the theme ‘What does Christmas mean to you?’ We were asked to design the supporting collateral – stamp packs, first day covers, envelopes, hand stamps etc – the perfect chance to get our hands dirty and meddle in some good old fashioned finger painting. (You can see more of our work with the Royal Mail over here).

We’d also like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very merry Christmas and a happy new year. Here’s to a happy and successful 2014.

#Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram. #Crabtree17 December—
A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).
Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 
All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram.

#Crabtree
17 December

A lot has been written about the impact and role that social media can have as an organisation rebrands, refreshes or launches a new service. Generally the widest coverage tends focus on the negative or controversial (see Gap, University of California or even Everton FC).

Well there are plenty of benefits too. One positive is having the chance to see images of our work pop up all over the world. Having completed work on Crabtree & Evelyn’s Christmas theme back in February it’s been great seeing images appear on Instagram or Twitter from places ranging from Singapore to Cincinnati. Far from the staged photography employed by many design studios (including NB) mobile photography shows people interacting with and enjoying the products, albeit in a square format and through a variety of filters. 

All images shown here were borrowed from Instagram.

Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications. Smart, Relevant, Provocative11 December—
Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.
The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.
NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.
The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 
The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.
NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications.

Smart, Relevant, Provocative
11 December

Tomorrow night is the press night of ‘American Psycho - a new musical thriller’ and further unveiling of our new work with the Almeida Theatre.

The Almeida Theatre sought to refresh their identity which was last updated over ten years ago.

NB were appointed in October and after an intensive period of immersion and briefing sessions with a small group of people, we highlighted the themes that resonated most deeply and would inform our work. It was clear then that this was to be a bold re-brand rather than mere cosmetic enhancement.

The work marks the appointment of their new artistic director Rupert Goold (think: ENRON, Chimerica) and represents a dramatic new direction for the Company. 

The new visual language reflects the theatre’s boldness of purpose, contemporary relevance and ambition to challenge and question theatre, the stage, the play and its dialogue with the world.

NB are working with the Almeida Theatre to ensure effective and creative use of the branding in future communications.

NB Wednesday4 December—
After all the excitement of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, we thought we’d join in. Until Friday 13th December, there’s 10% off most items in our shop and free UK delivery. Happy shopping!

NB Wednesday
4 December

After all the excitement of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, we thought we’d join in. Until Friday 13th December, there’s 10% off most items in our shop and free UK delivery. Happy shopping!

The streets of Milan, in Miami 28 November  —
In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 
This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!
It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop. The streets of Milan, in Miami 28 November  —
In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 
This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!
It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop.

The streets of Milan, in Miami
28 November

In just over a week our ‘Milan l’è un gran Milan’ will surely qualify for the best travelled designer jigsaw puzzle ever, thanks to the opening of the Wallpaper* Handmade best-of-show exhibition in Miami. 

This cousin of our London’s Kerning typographic map was originally commissioned by Wallpaper* for their Handmade exhibition in Milan. Since then it’s been chosen as one of the best exhibits from the last 5 years of Handmade, and has therefore been displayed with some big names (Karl Lagerfeld, Konstantin Grcic, Poltrona Frau, Naoto Fukasawa, Brioni, Michael Anastassiades, the late David Collins, Peter Saville, Barber Osgerby, Hervé Van der Straeten, Johanna Grawunder) in the windows at Harrods. Now the map and puzzle are off to Miami to form part of Design Miami. If you are in the area, pop in and let us know how it looks!

It turns out we were woefully naive regarding the logistics of transporting a 810mm x 570mm jigsaw puzzle – fully  constructed – last time we moved it. The result was a frantic afternoon crammed into the corner window at Harrods reconstructing it in situ. So this time, in preparation for a trans-Atlantic flight, we’ve secured the pieces together in small sections. Of course, if we’d been cleverer we would have offered to assemble it in person (in Miami)! If you’d like a copy of the Milan or London poster for Christmas, visit our shop.